• YouTube: Creating Content You Like vs Creating Content For an Audience

    audience YouTube: Creating Content You Like vs Creating Content For an Audience

    After speaking and moderating a variety of panels in the last 2 years on topics relating to YouTube and new media, one of the biggest questions that come up is “how to generate an audience?”. From a perspective of a marketer like myself, if I were to consult someone on building an audience for a new channel; my initial game plan would be something like:

    1. Analyze target demographic using a variety of analytics tools available online.
    2. Build content that I think would appeal to that demographics interests.
    3. Share all over with intention for it to go “viral”.

    However, as I’ve met more YouTube creators and covered the space as a journalist, I found that most of the top channels consists of people who simply made content that they personally liked; and wanted to share with the rest of the world. Sometimes, I feel that one of the main reasons why many of the Google-funded channels failed was that too much was focused on creating “formulas” like the one above, instead of focusing on the heart of creating great content online: PASSION.

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  • The One Thing YouTubers Need To Focus On To Make Sure Their Career Lasts

    youtube split1 The One Thing YouTubers Need To Focus On To Make Sure Their Career Lasts

    The last couple months have been very eventful for those in the online video space. Apart from notable acquisitions and new media talents signing to big agencies, it seems like the biggest thing creators are worried about is the changes on YouTube that may decide the fate of their careers. It’s no secret that the biggest complaint towards YouTube is the fact that they seem to be leaving independent creators in the dark with their efforts in “legitimizing” their content.

    But I’m not writing this post to “trash” on YouTube, there have been many posts (like this one) that has already done the job. In my personal opinion, YouTube is a business and will always be doing whatever it takes to continue building their company and improving the bottom-line for all their shareholders. We can complain all we want, but ultimately, YouTube makes the last call when it comes to the changes they want to make for their platform.

    Last week, internet entrepreneur Jason Calacanis made a blog post basically urging independent YouTube creators to work on straying away from their dependency on YouTube. He then made a follow-up post giving a general breakdown of what he thinks would make a better YouTube. Since publishing the post, I’ve gotten multiple emails asking me for my personal opinion on Jason’s piece, so here it is:

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